Writing Guidelines and Ethics

Articles sent to the editorial staff of the Lentera Journal: Journal of Educational Studies must comply with the following technical requirements:

  1. An article is conceptual writing or the result of educational science research in the various scopes of Nuance studies, which include: a) Scientific Education Studies; b) Educational innovations; c) Educational thinking;
  2. Articles are authentic works and have never been published in other scientific periodicals or book pieces;
  3. Articles are written in standard Indonesian with 1.5 cm spacing on A4 paper and sent to the email address: journal.stkipalamindpu@gmail.com. Writing length is 20-25 pages or 7000 to 9000 words. Articles must be submitted no later than one month before the journal is published;
  4. Include abstract in English up to 200 words; in each abstract followed by keywords ( keyword );
  5. The name of the author of the article (without an academic degree or position) is included along with the correspondence address, email address, and/or cell phone number, and affiliation;
  6. Reference in the article uses the footnote model by taking into account the specificities of the references referred to, such as books, translated books, volume books, potpourri books, articles in anthologies, articles in journals, articles in encyclopedias, articles on websites (internet), articles in mass media (magazines, newspapers, etc.), theses, theses, dissertations, and holy books. For example:
  7. Writing references using Turkish standards or the Chicago reference
  8. standards

 

More complete writing of the Turabian model can be seen in

http://www.press.uchicago.edu/books/turabian/turabian_citationguide.html </ p>

Book

One Author

  1. Malcolm Gladwell, The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference (Boston: Little, Brown, 2000), 64-65.
  2. Gladwell, Tipping Point, 71.

Gladwell, Malcolm. The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference. Boston: Little, Brown, 2000.

Two Authors

  1. Peter Morey and Amina Yaqin, Framing Muslims: Stereotyping and Representation after 9/11 (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2011), 52.
  2. Morey and Yaqin, Framing Muslims, 60-61.

Morey, Peter, and Amina Yaqin. Framing Muslims: Stereotyping and Representation after 9/11. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2011.

For four or more authors, list all of the authors in the bibliography; in the note, list only the first author, followed by "et al." ("and others"):

  1. Jay M. Bernstein et al., Art and Aesthetics after Adorno (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2010), 276.
  2. Bernstein et al., Art and Aesthetics, 18.

Bernstein, Jay M., Claudia Brodsky, Anthony J. Cascardi, Thierry de Duve, Ales Erjavec, Robert Kaufman, and Fred Rush. Art and Aesthetics after Adorno. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2010.

Editors or translators Not authors

  1. Richmond Lattimore, trans., The Iliad of Homer (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1951), 91-92.
  2. Lattimore, Iliad, 24.

Lattimore, Richmond, trans. The Iliad of Homer. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1951.

Editors or translators other than authors

  1. Jane Austen, Persuasion: An Annotated Edition, ed. Robert Morrison (Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2011), 311-12.
  2. Austen, Persuasion, 315.

Austen, Jane. Persuasion: An Annotated Edition. Edited by Robert Morrison. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2011.

Chapter or Other Part of a Book

  1. Angeles Ramirez, "Muslim Women in the Spanish Press: The Persistence of Subaltern Images," in Muslim Women in War and Crisis: Representation and Reality, ed. Faegheh Shirazi (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2010), 231.
  2. Ramirez, "Muslim Women," 239-40.

Ramirez, Angeles. "Muslim Women in the Spanish Press: The Persistence of Subaltern Images." In Muslim Women in War and Crisis: Representation and Reality, edited by Faegheh Shirazi, 227-44. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2010.

Foreword, introduction, or similar parts of a book

  1. William Cronon, foreword to The Republic of Nature, by Mark Fiege (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2012), ix.
  2. Cronon, foreword, x-xi.

Cronon, William. Foreword to The Republic of Nature, by Mark Fiege, ix-xii. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2012.

Books Published Electronically

If a book is available in more than one format, please cite the version you consulted. For books consulted online, include an access date and a URL. If you consulted the book in a library or commercial database, you may give the name of the database instead of a URL. If no fixed page numbers are available, you can include a section title or a chapter, or another number.

  1. Isabel Wilkerson, The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration (New York: Vintage, 2010), 183-84, Kindle.
  2. Philip B. Kurland and Ralph Lerner, eds., The Founders' Constitution (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987), chap. 10, doc. 19, accessed October 15, 2011, http://press-pubs.uchicago.edu/founders/.
  3. Joseph P. Quinlan, The Last Economic Superpower: The Retreat of Globalization, the End of American Dominance, and What We Can Do About It (New York: McGraw-Hill, 2010), 211, accessed December 8, 2012, ProQuest Ebrary.
  4. Wilkerson, Warmth of Other Suns, 401.
  5. Kurland and Lerner, Founders' Constitution .
  6. Quinlan, Last Economic Superpower, 88.

Wilkerson, Isabel. The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration. New York: Vintage, 2010. Kindle.

Kurland, Philip B., and Ralph Lerner, eds. The Founders' Constitution. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987. Accessed October 15, 2011. http://press-pubs.uchicago.edu/founders/.

Quinlan, Joseph P. The Last Economic Superpower: The Retreat of Globalization, the End of American Dominance, and What We Can Do About It. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2010. Accessed December 8, 2012. ProQuest Ebrary.

Journal Articles

In a note, list the specific page numbers consulted, if any. In the bibliography, list the page range for the whole article.

Article in a Print Journal

  1. Alexandra Bogren, "Gender and Alcohol: The Swedish Press Debate," Journal of Gender Studies 20, no. 2 (June 2011): 156.
  2. Bogren, "Gender and Alcohol," 157.

Bogren, Alexandra. "Gender and Alcohol: The Swedish Press Debate." Journal of Gender Studies 20, no. 2 (June 2011): 155-69.

Articles in Online Journal

For a journal article consulted online, include an access date and a URL. For articles that include a DOI, form the URL by appending the DOI to http://dx.doi.org/ rather than using the URL in your address bar. The DOI for the article in the Brown example below is 10.1086 / 660696. If you consulted the article in a library or commercial database, you may give the name of the database instead.

  1. Campbell Brown, "Consequentialize This," Ethics 121, no. 4 (July 2011): 752, accessed December 1, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/660696.
  2. Anastacia Kurylo, "Linsanity: The Construction of (Asian) Identity in an Online New York Knicks Basketball Forum," China Media Research 8, no. 4 (October 2012): 16, accessed March 9, 2013, Academic OneFile.
  3. Brown, "Consequentialize This," 761.
  4. Kurylo, "Linsanity," 18-19.

Brown, Campbell. "Consequentialism This." Ethics 121, no. 4 (July 2011): 749-71. Accessed December 1, 2012. http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/660696.

Kurylo, Anastacia. "Linsanity: The Construction of (Asian) Identity in an Online New York Knicks Basketball Forum." China Media Research 8, no. 4 (October 2012): 15-28. Accessed March 9, 2013. Academic OneFile.

Magazine articles

  1. Jill Lepore, "Dickens in Eden," New Yorker, August 29, 2011, 52.
  2. Lepore, "Dickens in Eden," 54-55.

Lepore, Jill. "Dickens in Eden." New Yorker, August 29, 2011.

Newspaper article

Newspaper articles may be cited in running text ("As Elisabeth Bumiller and Thom Shanker noted in a New York Times article on January 23, 2013,...") instead of in a note, and they are commonly omitted from a bibliography. The following examples show the more formal versions of the citations.

  1. Elisabeth Bumiller and Thom Shanker, "Pentagon Lifts Ban on Women in Combat," New York Times, January 23, 2013, accessed January 24, 2013, HTTP: // www.nytimes.com/2013/01/24/us/pentagon-says-it-is-lifting-ban-on-women-in-combat.html.
  2. Bumiller and Shanker, "Pentagon Lifts Tires."

Bumiller, Elisabeth, and Thom Shanker. "Pentagon Lifts Tires on Women in Combat." New York Times, January 23, 2013. Accessed January 24, 2013. http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/24/us/pentagon-says-it-is-lifting- ban-on-women-in-combat.html.

Book Reviews

  1. Joel Mokyr, review of Natural Experiments of History, ed. Jared Diamond and James A. Robinson, American Historical Review 116, no. 3 (June 2011): 754, accessed December 9, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/ahr.116.3.752.
  2. Mokyr, review of Natural Experiments of History, 752.

Mokyr, Joel. Review of Natural Experiments of History, edited by Jared Diamond and James A. Robinson. American Historical Review 116, no. 3 (June 2011): 752-55. Accessed December 9, 2011. http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/ahr.116.3.752.

Thesis or Dissertation

  1. Dana S. Levin, "Let's Talk about Sex... Education: Exploring Youth Perspectives, Implicit Messages, and Unexamined Implications of Sex Education in Schools" (Ph.D. diss., University of Michigan, 2010), 101-2.
  2. Levin, "Let's Talk about Sex," 98.

Levin, Dana S. "Let's Talk about Sex... Education: Exploring Youth Perspectives, Implicit Messages, and Unexamined Implications of Sex Education in Schools." Ph.D. diss., University of Michigan, 2010.

Paper Presented at a Meeting or Conference

Paper presented at the meeting or conference

  1. Rachel Adelman, "'Such Stuff as Dreams Are Made On': God's Footstool in the Aramaic Targumim and Midrashic Tradition" (paper presented at the annual meeting for the Society of Biblical Literature, New Orleans, Louisiana, November 21-24, 2009).
  2. Adelman, "Such Stuff as Dreams."

Adelman, Rachel. "'Such Stuff as Dreams Are Made On': God's Footstool in the Aramaic Targumim and Midrashic Tradition." Paper presented at the annual meeting for the Society of Biblical Literature, New Orleans, Louisiana, November 21-24, 2009.

Website

A citation to website content can often be limited to a mention in the text or in a note ("As of July 27, 2012, Google's privacy policy had been updated to include ..."). If a more formal citation is desired, it may be styled as in the examples below. Because such content is subject to change, include an access date and, if available, a date that the site was last modified.

  1. "Privacy Policy," Google Policies & amp; Principles, last modified July 27, 2012, accessed January 3, 2013, http://www.google.com/policies/privacy/.
  2. Google, "Privacy Policy."

Google. "Privacy Policy." Google Policies & amp; Principles. Last modified July 27, 2012. Accessed January 3, 2013. http://www.google.com/policies/privacy/.

Blog Posts or Comments

Blog entries or comments may be cited in running text ("In a comment posted to The Becker-Posner Blog on February 16, 2012, ...") instead of in a note, and they are commonly omitted from a bibliography. The following examples show the more formal versions of the citations.

  1. Gary Becker, "Is Capitalism in Crisis ?" The Becker-Posner Blog, February 12, 2012, accessed February 16, 2012, HTTP: //www.becker -posner-blog.com/2012/02/is-capitalism-in-crisis-becker.html.
  2. Becker, "Is Capitalism in Crisis?"

Becker, Gary. "Is Capitalism in Crisis?" The Becker-Posner Blog, February 12, 2012. Accessed February 16, 2012. http://www.becker-posner-blog.com/2012/02/is-capitalism-in-crisis- becker.html.

E-mail and Text Message

E-mail and text messages may be cited in running text ("In a text message to the author on July 21, 2012, John Doe revealed...") instead of in a note, and they are rarely listed in a bibliography. The following example shows the more formal version of a note.

John Doe, e-mail message to author, July 21, 2012.